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Heaven Is High, and the Emperor Is Far Away
By Jim Phelps

Being English, the idea of my typical summer holiday is a stifling drive to the beach. Well, not a proper beach, as it’s England. You could certainly say it was sandy, but it takes the cheek of some over-zealous busybody working for the council to call it a beach. Like clockwork, upon arrival the dark clouds inevitably roll over and the family arguments begin. Perfect.

Here in China, my natural cynicism is swiftly disposed with when faced with such a vast and bewildering array of options of unique experiences and sights. The question of where to go can be a confusing one when armed with a Lonely Planet that looks twice as daunting as War and Peace and three times as big. Many foreigners are drawn to a familiar itinerary of locales – Beijing, Hong Kong, Shanghai, Yellow Mountain, Guilin. Everyone ostensibly returns with similar stories, so last summer I decided to do something a little different.

If you’re happy to get a little out of your comfort zone and cast the net a little wider, a whole other world awaits you. Another China sleeps out there, somewhere beyond the leering megacities and rustling bamboo. Verdant meadows of wildflowers too numerous to count, desolate deserts where the dunes rise up as mountains, skies so big they stretch on forever. So what are you waiting for?

 

Xinjiang, which translates as New Frontier, is aptly-named. If you ever look at a map of China, Xinjiang is the big empty space in the northwest corner. It’s bigger than Tibet. It’s bigger than France, Spain and Germany combined. It’s bafflingly huge, and yet more people live in Shanghai’s metropolitan area than in the entire province. Xinjiang is universally gorgeous, and our first destination, Kanas Lake (喀纳斯湖), took us to the very edge of the Heavenly Kingdom.

There is an old proverb in China: Heaven is high and the Emperor is far away. Nowhere does that feel truer than at Kanas Lake, a dormant watery brute nestled between the towering Altai Mountains. Getting there is no easy task. It took thirty-six hours from our little flat in Hangzhou to the alpine valleys. After flying to Urumqi, a bus sped us into the sunset, the desert sky erupting in a bloody crimson, and when we awoke we found ourselves trundling through the sweeping foothills, a sea of grass punctuated with the white tents of Kazakh nomads. We reached the lake in the afternoon and took up an offer of accommodation inside a Kazakh family’s ranch – a little group of rugged log cabins perched above the valley basin. Each morning we awoke to the gentle sounds of grandpa’s lute playing and the cries of eagles, and threw open the cabin door for that first breath of crisp country air. 

The peaceful lake is bordered by mountains carpeted green with grass and trees, and in the distance looms Friendship Peak, where the borders of China, Mongolia, Russia and Kazakhstan meet. Many of the visitors and staff here are Siberian or Kazakh, and all incredibly friendly and curious. The glacial valley at Kanas defies description: so big that a camera lens can’t capture it all, dwarfing the little Kazakh and Tuvan villages that meekly crouch below.

A range of hair-raising activities are now opening up at Kanas, including whitewater rafting, rock-climbing and paragliding. There are lots of hiking trails around the lake, and campsites for those who can go without a warm bed and don’t mind the high altitude’s cold nights. Just don’t expect to be going swimming – I decided to go for a dip and nearly froze inside two minutes. I was lucky not to fall victim to one of the monstrous fish that live in the depths of the lake. The local legends of mysterious creatures dwelling beneath Kanas have recently been given credence by several shaky handheld videos that have surfaced in recent years, so if you come, come with a video camera! Kanas is recommended for its placid alpine beauty, the circling eagles, the still quiet and the sunset at midnight. Devoid of foreign tourists, it has that indefinable sense of detachment from the rest of China.

Back to Urumqi then, which is a great stopping-off point and the centre of Xinjiang’s transport network. You can expect to go back and forth to the capital city a few times if you spend a long time in the province as the city’s bus and train routes connect the province’s disparate urban pockets.

Our next stop was Turpan (吐鲁番), which at 154m below sea level is the lowest place in China, and having been originally settled thousands of years ago is the cradle of civilization in this part of the world. Famous for its grapes, the Turpans grow them by the million in their little oasis town to make wine or dry them in one of countless dusty brick outhouses to make raisins. Over the years Turpan has proven to be a veritable treasure trove for archaeologists, who have discovered hundreds of dinosaur fossils throughout the county, well-preserved by the dry desert climate. Many of these can be seen in the wonderful (and free) museum.

The Turpan people are largely Uyghur, and the pace of life is lazy to say the least. Residents dress in colourful clothing, donkey carts shuffle languidly through the dusty streets, and families sleep outside in the open air together, all sharing one oversized bed. There are a wealth of places of interest near Turpan. We hopped on a minibus for an hour to Tuyoq (吐峪沟), a tiny oasis village in the shadow of the Flaming Mountain () and surrounded by scorching desert. Tuyoq is an ancient holy place for Muslim pilgrims – the first Chinese man to convert to Islam is buried here – and it is said that seven trips here is equivalent to one trip to Mecca. Settled over 1500 years ago, to this day only 300 people live here, eking out a living from their modest vineyards, selling dried fruit and mulberry juice. The Uyghur locals insisted on taking us into their homes to stay for lunch with them. I’m not sure what we ate, as their Mandarin was just as bad as mine, but it was quite palatable. If you’re looking for a very special experience where you can really engage with local people and their culture, this is the place.

Later that day we had time to check out Jiaohe Ruins (交河故城), a must if you are into ancient cities. The largest, oldest and best-preserved earthen city in the world, a visit to Jiaohe is like stepping into a time machine. Perched atop a natural fortress of towering cliffs and settled over 2000 years ago as a major trading station on the Silk Road, the city was one of the busiest and biggest in the world at its peak. Strolling around the immense buildings you can really imagine a bustling city of merchants and traders, but don’t stay too long, as the intense heat will melt you into a puddle!

Our last stop in Xinjiang was the gorgeous Nalati Grasslands (那拉提草原). It is said that Genghis Khan discovered the thin valley hidden in the west of the province when he was leading an expedition through the cold and barren mountains. The freezing temperatures and lack of food almost finished off his exhausted and famished army, until one day they were confronted with endless green pastures. Nalati is picturesque enough when you’re a tourist with a bellyful, but to Khan’s troops it must have seemed like heaven itself. It is recommended you travel here in June to August, as this is when the blue skies and green alpine forests are complimented with the countless yellow dots of wildflowers dancing in the sun. Cast your eyes up and you’ll see the clouds heaving their bones over the mountaintops. A sight to behold! The valley’s foothills are inhabited almost entirely by Kazakh nomadic herders whose tents sit lethargically every kilometer or so, interspersed with flocks of goats and cows. If you are lucky, you may even see the nomads hunting with trained eagles – a traditional practice handed down from generation to generation.

We pressed on to Zhangye in Gansu province, a beautiful overnight train ride past the Tianchi mountains, 100km of wind turbines spinning languorously and a heart-stopping sunset over the desert. This Silk Road city was the birthplace of Kublai Khan and home to Marco Polo for a year and maintains a sleepy feel despite its size, with young children splashing in the fountains. The main draws here are the Reclining Buddha Temple, the statue of Marco Polo and the beautiful park, where a local man asked me to marry his daughter. No thanks, chief. The main reason people come to Zhangye is to see the Danxia landform: 500 square kilometres of arresting rainbow-coloured mountains, formed by sandstone and mineral deposits over millions of years. It’s a singular, psychedelic spectacle. The best time to go is a sunny day after rain, where the mountains shimmer gloriously in the sun. Unfortunately when we went, there was a terrible storm. Despite this, the landform was still unearthly and preternatural.

Our next stop was the big one: Badain Jaran desert (aka Badanjilin desert ). If you’re sick of busy, ugly cities, then this is the place for you. Mysterious, miraculous and utterly isolated, the desert is difficult to get to but so, so worth the trouble. First you must get to Alashan, a one-horse town at the edge of the desert, and then rent a driver who will take you into the desert. Good research is a must here. I travelled with Mr. Fan, who was born to camel herders in the depths of Badain Jaran forty-five years ago. He’s lived there all his life. The rollercoaster ride through the desert is something I’ll never forget. The first hour is a rally race across scrubland and gravelly sand, but the following seven hours are where the real fun begins. Some dunes reach up to 500m high and every uphill struggle is rewarded by a sweeping vista as you clamber over the apex, followed by a terrifying plunge back down the other side. Our driver took absolute delight in using the dunes as skateboard ramps for his 4x4, tearing up the side, skidding 180° and diving back down.

The desert is a dreamlike place: constantly shifting and too vast to comprehend. Without any trees or buildings for context, it’s difficult to get an impression of just how big everything is. The dunes are really mountains in their own right, and there is nothing but sand, sand, sand in every direction, yet even here there is life. As we were enjoying a swim in an oasis, two wolves appeared on the crest of a high dune, eyeing the herd of goats watering with us. Later, camels plodded in to drink and cool down from the baking 45°C heat. After an 80km drive we pitched up and watched paralyzed as the sun tumbled down behind the horizon, burning the sands a golden red. A calm came over us all. We hadn’t seen a single soul all day and were completely alone in this gorgeous wilderness, the luckiest people in the world. In Mr. Fan’s one room house beside a mirrored lake, his wife cooked us dinner made with a grass that grows in the oases. In the soundless desolation of night the sky was so clear you could see the silvery belt of the Milky Way silently gliding across the black. The sunrise over the lake was even more extraordinary, and we felt utterly alone.

It took us a day to get to Hohhot (呼和浩特), Inner Mongolia’s capital, and from there we went straight to Xilamuren grasslands (希拉穆仁草原), staying in yurts on a working farm. The trip was organized by Anda Guesthouse in Hohhot, and they come highly recommended by many who have stayed there. There were about six people in each yurt, and while this sounds like a lot, it really helps at night when it gets very cold indeed. The grasslands are flat in every direction – no hills, no trees. In the afternoon we strolled up to a crude stupa, so crude it was practically a pile of rocks. Entire flocks of birds paced and twitched by a lake and then scattered and took off in unison as we approached. Herds of stocky chestnut horses and cattle roamed freely through the grasslands, and we were soon to find out that the cows weren’t just used for food.

As Xilamuren is devoid of trees, the nomads who have lived here for thousands of years need an alternate fuel source. I was unaware of this, and was quite surprised when in the early evening we were instructed by the Mongolian farmers to grab a bag and snatch up all the festering cow dung we could find. Meadow Muffins, it seems, are rich in undigested plant matter and burn up a treat. The bag becomes surprisingly heavy once you’ve got a few cow crepes in there.

Being a holiday of magnificent sunsets, Xilamuren had a lot to live up to and did not disappoint. As it fell, the sun painted golden light across the endless plains, and the immense Mongolian skies were lit with every colour from a vivid cerise in the west to royal purple in the east. Sadly, it was to be the last sunset before our return to Hangzhou.

And so the holiday was over, but what a trip it was. The whole thing was done on the cheap, without much sleep and at a dizzying pace – 10,000km in 14 days! My aim with this article is to introduce another side of China that you may not have heard of, to inspire you to go out that door. It’s not just the scenery; it’s the people, who could not be more happy and interested to meet you. In places that are really off the beaten track, many people may have not had contact with non-Asian people, and they just want to talk to you and show you their life. We met a Kazakh man named Atay on the way to Nalati, and he had nothing to his name, but immediately he left the bus to buy us lunch when it stopped, despite our protestations. He insisted we stay at his house and meet his family. The owners of our hostel in Nalati told us we were the first Westerners to ever stay there. They really make the time in these faraway places twice as special; their openness and kindness melts the heart and always makes it hard to leave. I’ll say it again: What are you waiting for?

A couple of (hopefully) useful notes on travelling through Xinjiang. Due to terrorist attacks in 2014, you should be aware that all roads between cities have mandatory police checkpoints to check your documents. Enforcement is fairly arbitrary – at some checkpoints you will be waved through without even checking your passport, but others will be more thorough. Always make sure that you have a valid passport, a valid visa and a ticket to show where you’re heading to. Secondly, sleeper trains are a necessity here. The vast distances between places may mean up to twenty hours of travelling, so overnight train journeys mean you don’t waste your days travelling and also allow you to forgo the cost of a hostel or hotel. Book tickets in advance whenever possible and to avoid sleeper buses, which are smellier, less comfortable and slower. Thirdly, good command of Mandarin is really helpful too as few people speak English in the remote parts of China. Indeed, some may not speak Mandarin, so a Uyghur phrasebook may be helpful. Fourthly, pick your time of year carefully – winter is exceptionally cold. Check online for details of local festivals: there are lots of interesting cultural experiences that you can be a part of if you choose the right time to go.

Lastly, before travelling to Badain Jaran desert, check online if permits are required, as on occasion foreigners are asked to hold one before entering the area. When I travelled, the requirement had been lifted, but it could come back at any time in the future.

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Get Lost in the Maze-like Concentric Rings of Buildings "Tulou”

Uncover the Secrets of the Fujian Earth Buildings

T I M E 


Tour Signup Deadline: December 20th
Tour Date: December 21st – December 24th

V E N U E 

Xiamen, Fujian
福建,厦门

T I C K E T S 

Price: 1,999RMB/adult
(Min 10 Pax, Max 16 Pax)

There’s no doubt – if your destination is Fujian and the south-east, you’re doing yourself a disservice if you miss these mammoth World Heritage wonders! Take four days to visit the Tulou closed settlements (pronounced “two”-“low”) for an encounter with China’s ancient Hakka culture, then let a local guide you to experience the real heart of life in Xiamen.

Highlights

1. Explore the Tulou and discover why these mammoth communal dwellings were deemed precious items World Cultural Heritage – study their wisdom to get a unique look into Hakka culture!

2. Spend the night in comfortable Tulou tavern room lodging at the Hongkeng Tulou cluster’s Renquan’yuan Lou, ‘Square’ Lou or Wufeng Lou.

3. Get lost in the maze-like concentric rings of buildings inside the “King Tulou”, or seek out the ‘slither of sunlight’ in the Gaobei Tulou cluster. Had enough of Hakka Tulous? Then explore a different mystery in the Da’di Southern Min Tulou groupings in Hua’an.

What's included

1. 8 Meals (Including Breakfast x3,  Lunch x3, Dinner x2)
2. 3 Night’s Stay in Comfortable Hotels(Double occupancy, for single supplement please add 550 rmb)
3. Activity costs and admission fares for all items on the itinerary.
4. All transportation costs for the itinerary (Airport and Station pickup not included)
5. Full travel accident insurance for the duration of the trip.
6. Full bilingual guide accompaniment.

Not included

1. Transportation costs to Xiamen and Xiamen Plaza Hotel
2. All additional costs incurred by the individual not mentioned in the itinerary above.

Important Information

1. This is a coupled Chinese-foreign tour, meaning your tour group will include both Chinese natives and foreign expats. There is a minimum 10-person (maximum 16-person) signup threshold that must be reached for this tour to go ahead. If you sign up and the threshold is not reached, the cost of the tour will be refunded in the means by which you paid.

2. Want to come? Signup can be completed through the TA mini-program. Once the group reaches the minimum number of attendees you will receive a message from TA customer support confirming that the tour will go ahead.

If after successful payment and signup you become unable to attend your booked tour, your refund will be processed minus deductions as per the following scheme by the Trendy Adventurer Financial Affairs team:

- 14 or 14+ days before the activity date: 1% of the signup cost;
- 7 or 14 days before the activity date: 10% of the signup cost;
-7 to 3 days before the activity commencement date: 40% of the signup cost;
-3 to 1 day(s) before the activity commencement date: 55% of the signup cost;
-Within 24 hours of the activity commencement date: 70% of the signup cost.

Refunds will be processed within 5 working days after the date of conclusion of the tour.
(if the air ticket is included in the itinerary and the air ticket has been issued, 100% air ticket loss shall be borne, because the group ticket cannot be changed or refunded)

Take the Train With Just Your Passport

Standing in line for high speed train tickets is a thing of the past. Just enter the station and board the train by scanning your passport. This is a huge time saver for expats and international visitors who are denied access to the automatic ticketing machines.

This week I bought four tickets for travel between Hangzhou East and Yuhang. I used Chinese language APPs 12306 & Ctrip as well as English language apps Trip.com and China Train Ticket for 铁路12306火车票. Each APP was successful for boarding trains without paper tickets, which was not the case when I did this two weeks ago.

Because the English Trip.com charge a 20RMB service fee, it was a little disappointing that they didn't seem to give the boarding gate information, however it was easy to check the departures board once I was on the station concourse. I contacted their help desk and they said that they’ll pass the suggestion on to their IT team.

BTW, I didn't actually travel on each train - I just waited for each boarding time and went to the gate to scan my passport to check the success of each booking.­

PS - Paper tickets are still available for business travellers seeking reimbursement.

Here’s the current procedure when you arrive at Hangzhou East Railway Station:

1. At any of the station's entrances, expats and international visitors must go to the manual line which is usually situated at the far left.

2. For the security check, place all bags on the conveyor before being scanned quickly by security staff.

3.Trip.com users can check the departures board to see which gate to use. (The other APPs inform you online).

4. To access the platform for boarding, go to the manual line (usually on the right hand side) and scan your passport

Hot Spring Weekend Trip at Wuyi Forest

Wuyi Forest Hot Spring
Weekend Trip

T I M E 
Tour Signup Deadline: December 13th
Tour Date: December 14th – December 15th

V E N U E 
Wuyi, Zhejiang
浙江,武义

T I C K E T S 
Price: 865RMB/adult
(Min 10 Pax, Max 16 Pax)

Tour the scenic mountain forest reserve, admire stunning scenes of peaks and streams, and experience the rugged glass cliff-face and treetop canopy walkways at Niutou Mountain Forest Park. Check in at the in-park Hot Spring Inn and spend a night enjoying invigorating hot spring baths, deep in the forest.

Highlight

1. Explore the Niutou Mountain Forest Parks, long known as the “Jiuzhaigou Valley* of Zhejiang”, experiencing the thrilling glass cliff-face walkway and forest canopy treetop walkway.

2. Spend an away from the cold of winter, soaking in pure comfort in hot spring pools at the Hot Spring Inn.

(Note*: Jiuzhaigou Valley is a National Nature Reserve Park and UNESCO World Heritage Site in located in Northern Sichuan, China. The park is known for its many multi-level waterfalls and colorful lakes.)

What's included

1. Round-trip shared transfer
2. Pickup and drop-off from designated meeting points
3. One night's lodging in the Hot Spring Inn(A standard room)
4. Breakfast of Day 2
5. English-speaking Tour Guide
6. Travel Accident Insurance
7. All taxes, fees and handling charges
8. Explore the Niutou Mountain Forest National Park – the glass cliff and forest canopy walkways, and bathe in the Dream Spring hot springs. (includes scenic area entry ticket, glass walkway shoe wraps, hot spring entry ticket, sightseeing bus costs, etc.)

Costs does not include: other meals and personal purchases.
Note:You must bring your own bathing suit.

Important Information
Concerning the Hot Springs


1. Senior citizens over 70 years of age, pregnant women, women in menstruation and individuals weakened by sickness are all prohibited from entering the hot spring baths.

2. Minors or senior citizens with reduced mobility must have a guardian or adult caretaker present when in the hot springs.

3. It is recommended that individuals do not bathe in the hot spring baths for excessive periods of time.

4. Individuals who have suffered from or currently suffer from heart disease, high blood pressure, frailty of health or alcoholism are urged not to use the hot spring baths.

5. Wherever the above-mentioned cautions are ignored and an individual who has entered the hot spring baths meets with an unforeseen incident, hot spring management will not be responsible for payment of compensation.

6. Before using the hot spring, please review the relevant hot spring usage notes and bathe safely.

Additional Info

1. Children must be accompanied by an adult
2. Please advise any specific dietary requirements at time of booking
3. Minimum numbers apply. There is a possibility of cancellation after confirmation if there are not enough passengers to meet requirements. In the event of this occurring, you will be offered an alternative or full refund ( ONLY FOR GROUP TOUR)

Private Departures for This Tour

If the dates we have available for this tour don't suit your needs, or you are not sure travelling as part of a group is for you, maybe a Private Departure would be more ideal. Based on exactly the same itinerary as the group tour, our Private Departures give you the freedom to choose your own departure date and simply enjoy your holiday with your family, your partner, or your friends. On Private Departures your tour will be led by an English speaking local guides in each destination.

Notes

1. Pricing for children under 12 years old who do not require an individual bed is 560RMB per person; Pricing for children above 12 years old share the same price as adult.

2. Breakfast cost for accompanying minors is 30RMB per person. (paid on site)

After signing up, for insurance purposes attendees are required to provide their name, phone number, Passport/ID Card number and passport information;
After making payment and signing-up, if for any reason you become unable to attend, refunds given will be subject to following loss expense rates:

A. 3 days or more prior to departure date – 1% of the total tour cost
B. 2 to 1 days before departure date = 55% of total tour cost
C. On the day of departure - 75% of total tour cost

All refunds will be paid to the relevant accounts within 10 working days of the conclusion of the tour event.

Caring for Your Skin During the Winter Season

Your skin is the largest organ that you have in your body and it is one that has multiple uses. It not only covers and protects everything inside your body, but it also helps your body stay at just the right temperature and allows you to have the sense of touch. Your skin, however, is often the one organ that we do not look after-especially during this time of year.

The winter and spring are particularly vulnerable seasons for your skin. The winter in particular can play a huge role in the way your skin reacts. This is especially the case in the northern parts of China where the weather is harsh, cold, dry, and dusty. People with sensitive or dry skin are particularly prone to problems during the winter season.

A common condition during the winter season and one that we treat often is dry, itchy skin. If you are suffering from this condition it is often easily treated, but remember to see your dermatologist or doctor straight away to be properly diagnosed.

By following the tips below, you will be able to beat dry itchy skin before it even starts this winter.

Tips to help you get your skin through the winter season

Do not take more than one shower/bath a day
Over washing removes the natural lubricant that skin produces and makes skin dry and flaky.

Do not shower/bathe for more than 10 minutes
The longer you stay in the water, the drier your skin will get.

Do not shower/bathe in hot water
Heat increases the rate that water evaporates from your skin leaving it dry. Luke warm water is a better choice.

Avoid saunas and steam baths
Like hot showers, they increase the rate that water evaporates from your skin leaving it dry.

Use a mild formula soap or shower gel and don't exfoliate

Apply moisturizing cream right after you shower/bathe while your skin is still damp

Moisturizers lock water into your skin but do not help add water so the best time to apply them is straight after your body has been in contact with water. For very dry weather, a thin moisturizer that is applied after a shower is not enough; in this circumstance, some thicker and greasier creams will do a better job.

Avoid wearing nylon or woolen clothing because these materials can irritate your skin
Loose fitting undergarments made out of 100% cotton are best when your skin is dry.

Air-conditioners, over-heated rooms, and windy weather all make the environment dry, which in turn can make your skin dry
To combat this, put some plants, fish-tanks, or humidifiers in your office and home.

Apply some extra protection if you have to go out on a windy day

The sun is not as hot or bright in winter

however, if you are outdoors for long periods of time, your skin can still get sunburned, particularly in the snow
Be sure to apply sunscreen in these cases.

Avoid spicy food as it can make your skin dry and itchy

Drink lots of water and limit your intake of alcohol


Dr. Eason Zhong is the Dermatology of United Family Hangzhou Clinic, he speaks English and Mandarin. To make an appointment with him, call 0571-89705148 or scan the QR code.

Clinic Hours:
8:30am -5:30pm,
Mondays – Saturdays
(Closed on Sundays)
0571 8970 5148

Learning about IGCSEs at Wellington

Time
9am to 11am, Tuesday, December 3rd
9am to 11am, Tuesday, December 17th

Venue
Wellington College International Hangzhou 
 杭州惠灵顿外籍人员子女学校 
2399 Xuezhi Road, Xiaoshan District, Hangzhou 
杭州市萧山区宁围街道学知路2399号

Wellington College International Hangzhou is pleased to announce the opening of admissions for their first ever cohort of Year 10 students to take the IGCSEs in the 2020-2021 academic year.

What are the IGCSEs?

IGCSE stands for International General Certificate of Secondary Education, which is a globally recognised qualification taken in Years 10 and 11 (Grades 9 and 10) and carries the same weight as the GCSEs that are offered within the UK. The IGCSE is one of the most sought after and recognised qualifications in the world, because it helps students develop core skills and competencies, including investigative skills, problem solving, teamwork and critical thinking. These skills are highly sought after by universities around the world, and as such, students who have completed the IGCSEs are generally regarded as highly competent candidates to enter such universities.

IGCSEs are also the most popular international qualification in schools around the world, with more than 4,800 schools over 150 countries doing the Cambridge International Examinations version of the IGCSE alone. Enrolling your child in the IGCSE programme at Wellington will provide them with a vital boost to their academic career, which will not only help them build on their study skills, but will make them more competitive and prepared to enter their senior school programme, whether that is offering A Levels or the IB Diploma Programme.

For the 2020-2021 academic year, Wellington College International Hangzhou is accepting an extremely limited number of applicants into Year 10 and is seeking students who will be able to achieve the world-standard results expected of them at Wellington.

In reflection of the importance of this first cohort, Wellington College International Hangzhou is proud to announce a range of scholarships, including an academic scholarship for Year 10 that includes significant reductions in tuition fees for the duration of the two-year IGCSE programme, with the option for this to be extended throughout the two-year A Level programme, subject to a favourable academic assessment.

This is an exciting opportunity for talented students in Hangzhou to receive a significant tuition reduction, allowing access to the world-class holistic education which Wellington has to offer.

As well as meeting the admissions requirements for Wellington College International Hangzhou, and being able to demonstrate significant academic potential as determined through the admissions assessment process, other traits that Wellington College International Hangzhou seeking from their Wellingtonian pupils include;

An international outlook and a desire to be a global citizen of the future

A willingness to work hard with a positive attitude towards learning

A desire to develop all Wellington Identities, to take full advantage of the opportunities on offer at Wellington and show a commitment to making a positive contribution to the wider Wellington community

An aspiration to live by the Wellington Values

To learn more about the IGCSEs and the academic scholarship programme, we encourage prospective parents to join Wellington for their IGCSE Parent Information Sessions being held on Tuesday, December 3rd and Tuesday December 17th.

To register to attend an information session, please scan the QR code below, or follow the link at the bottom of this post.

If you would prefer a private tour, please contact the admissions team at your convenience via phone at (+86-571) 8239 6366 or by emailing admissions.wcih@wellingtoncollege.cn

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