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Top 12 Chinese Network Buzzwords in 2014
By MORE Team

Buzzword: stock phrases that have become nonsense through endless repetition.

In the internet era, in this carnival of language, no one needs to worry about not having anything to say. Social media sites are literally abuzz with a dizzying array of jargon. In the presence of this raging torrent of information, everyone can use social media to disseminate information and to express their points of views. Even if you don’t have any imaginative opinions or abstract ideas, it does not matter. Those cute, sometimes nonsensical, universal words or phrases – network buzzwords – will save you in dire straits. Whatever the case is, just add an "I am drunk" or "Here comes the question, which excavator’s technology is the strongest?" plus a nose picking emoticon, and you are instantly upgraded to someone who is using the “insider language.” However, it is also the universal property of the sentence that greatly weakens the uniqueness of the expression. Because everyone is afraid of being “out of the know,” they latch onto these words and use them and reuse them until there is nothing left but a stack of bones. This relentless process explains how seriously this generation is suffering from the lack of communication skills. Now the real question is coming...

French sociologist Jean Baudrillard defined consumption as "a systematic behavior of the manipulation of symbols," whether it is physical or language, it must become a symbol in order to become an object of consumption. When a phrase or sentence is turned into a network buzzword, it is signified. A statement can have the possibility of being replicated only when it becomes a symbol, then it turns into a universal sentence to be consumed by all. In the eyes of Baudrillard, the nature of the modern consumer society is the difference of the construction. Consumption is not the material or the language itself, but the differences. When only a few people know how to use “excavators,” only a few people “are drunk,” then you can produce the exclusive pleasure by grasping and using the popular language. But when everyone is scrambling to use the excavators, when everyone is drunk, then the differences disappear. The people who are interested in network buzzwords can’t find the right word to express their feelings, so they consume the many fleeting network buzzwords to express their feelings, thus putting the words into the embarrassing position of becoming nonsensical through “endless repetition.”

Though some might look upon buzzword use as mindless drivel, they do indeed tell us much about the current culture. These words can describe new phenomena or provide a useful linguistic shortcut to describe complex ideas. You may not be a fan of using such clichéd language, but if you are a learner of Chinese, being able to understand the underlying meanings (and re-meanings) and to master the use of these popular phrases can be a wonderful tool in your box. However, buzzwords do fizzle out eventually, so while knowing these more recent popular sayings is a good thing, it’s up to you to continue keeping up with what’s trending. We've sifted through a plethora of Chinese network buzzwords in 2014 and come up with what we think were the buzziest buzzwords a buzzin’ last year. Some are more organically-derived, some a bit forced. Some of the buzz factor relates to the 90s generation’s nostalgia – harking back to the simpler days of their youth. Here they are for your consumption:

1. 萌萌哒 (méng méng da): So cute, so adorable
It is a well-known fact that most Asian girls like to be described as “cute.” 萌萌哒simply means too cute or too adorable. 萌萌哒 can also be萌萌的, but when de is replaced with da, the “adorable” index is greatly increased. Starting on Douban.com, it has gained in popularity because of a series of gifs released by the Palace Museum where the ancient emperor Yongzheng looks very cute. A more popular way to use this phrase is in the context of a selfie. You can raise your hand to make a scissor shape to put next to your eye or you can slightly pucker your lips and snap a shot. Post it on Weibo or WeChat and entitle it 感觉自己萌萌哒 (gǎn jué zì jǐ méng méng da): Feel myself so cute. This is a typical use by the 90s narcissist generation.

2.  且行且珍惜 (qiě xíng qiě zhēn xī): Cherish what you have at the moment
On March 31st 2014, Chinese actress Ma Yili posted on her Weibo about her actor husband Wen Zhang cheating on her. The full text is as follows: “Although it’s easy to love, marriage is not easy. Cherish what you have at the moment” (恋爱虽易, 婚姻不易, 且行且珍惜 liàn ài suī yì, hūn yīn bú yì, qiě xíng qiě zhēn xī). Wen Zhang admitted to his infidelity, and suddenly this sentence got popular all over the blogosphere inspiring people to weave it into their own posts:

A sports fan wrote: One goal is easy, but a streak is not easy, cherish what you have at the moment.

One middle class blogger wrote: Living is easy, life is not easy, cherish what you have at the moment.

A gamer wrote: Online is easy, offline is not easy, cherish what you have at the moment.

A relationship expert wrote: Making choices is easy, persistence is not easy, cherish what you have at the moment.

3. 逗比 (dòu bī): Funny dude
Dou bi is an easy phrase and can be understood as a “Funny dude.” Simply put, it is to say someone is very funny, a bit silly and cute. The use of bi adds to the “stupid” factor as it is also used to refer to a part of the female anatomy, so you will hear it used a lot in insults. We describe someone being silly as the number “2.” 二比 (èr bī) has the same meaning as dou bi. With the scope of the use of dou bi gradually expanding, more and more people use it as a neutral term. If someone is doing something, and this is something we believe to be silly, we can say he's a dou bi. If it is used to describe a stranger, it means that person is foolish. If used on a close friend, that is more like a joke!

4. 作死 (zuō sǐ): Seek death
Zuo si comes from不作死就不会死 (zuō jiù bù huì ). At the moment, this saying is still widely used within the social network, even on mainstream media forums. It was reported that this phrase is also used abroad, receiving over 1,600 likes among Western social media users within just three months. It is so widespread that the Urban Dictionary, an American online slang dictionary, has included it and defined it as “no zuo no die.” From the Urban Dictionary: “This phrase is of Chinglish origin. Means if you don't do stupid things, they won't come back and bite you in the ass. (But if you do, they most certainly will.) Zuo is a Chinese character meaning to act silly or daring (for attention).” Nowadays it is simply written as “no zuo no die” and not it Chinese characters. Here are the examples the Urban Dictionary gives:

A: Some dude baked cookies shaped like iPhone, held it by the mouth when driving, tried to mess with traffic cops. 
B: Did he pull it off? 
A: Cop was pissed and ran his name through the system. Turns out he's got speed tickets unpaid! 
B: No zuo no die.
A: Yesterday I wore sunglasses and watch movie using my flat computer with loud voice, at last, I found I lost my purse. 
B: No zuo no die.

5. 也是满拼的 (yě shì mǎn pīn de): Working too hard
This is a very simple oral discourse coming from the second season of the popular TV reality show Dad, Where are We Going? Singer Gary Tsao said it several times during filming, thus making it famous. It’s now widely used all over social media. The meaning is that even though you work very hard, you achieve no success – it’s meant ironically. As with most buzzwords, the meaning has evolved. The most common current use for this phrase is to refer to someone as “working too hard” to do something of little worth. For example, let’s say a guy is getting ready to go through security at the airport. He has a bottle of milk and doesn’t want to waste it, so he chugs it down. His girlfriend can say sarcastically to him, “你为了不浪费,你也是蛮拼的!” (“Ni wei le bu lang fei, ni ye shi man pin de!”) or “You worked so hard so that you didn’t waste it!” Now these words “working too hard” are well entrenched in the social media language. Even Chinese president Xi Jinping, in an attempt to be “down with the kids,” used it in his 2015 New Year’s speech: “In order to do the work well, our cadres from all levels are working too hard.” He’s the man!

6. 的节奏 (de jié zòu): In the rhythm of…
This phrase popped up several years ago. Some say it was used by gamers playing World of Warcraft 3, but that cannot be substantiated. The song "The Most Unusual National Wind" really sparked the craze. The lyrics: “What kind of rhythm is so cool” (“什么样的节奏,” “Shénme yàng de de jié zòu”) were plucked from this popular song and began to be used in every which way. It’s a catchy phrase that can be appropriated for being “in the rhythm” of just about anything:

How come you are quarrelling again? Is this in the rhythm of a break up?

I ate way too much. This is in the rhythm of getting fat.

I have been working two weeks straight without any break. I’m in the rhythm of dying.

7.  有钱就是任性 (yǒu qián jiù shì rèn xìng): Because I am rich I can do what I want
This is a true story. In April, Mr. Liu spent 1,760RMB online buying a healthcare product. Soon after, he got calls from a stranger who persuaded him to buy other similar medicinal products. In the following four months, Mr. Liu paid a total of 540,000RMB to the swindler. When asked, he said that he had already known he was being cheated when the mark hit 70,000RMB; "I just wanted to see how much they could take from me," he said. Early on, this phrase was used sarcastically (or begrudgingly?) to refer to the way that rich people arbitrarily do things. We saw it being used quite often on Weibo to flaunt wealth between friends. The famous Weibo blogger Wang Sicong wrote, “When I make friends, I don’t care if they are rich. I’m rich anyway.” It’s now been usurped to by netizens to establish their own sense of entitlement: “I’m great at exams, I can do whatever I want;” “I’m young, I can do whatever I want;” “I’m a MORE writer, I can write what I want;” and the list goes on.

8. 画面太美,我不敢看 (huà miàn tài měi, wǒ bù gǎn kàn): The picture is too beautiful, I can’t look at it
This buzzword comes from a sentence in Taiwanese singer Jolin Tsai's song "Prague Square" (2007). The lyrics “画面太美我不敢看” are intended to describe a thing so weird that one "can't bear to look at it." In the song, it is meant to be positive; however, now it has been twisted to express disgust. Take for example the Vietnamese remake of the 90s TV drama Huanzhu Gege. Bloggers said the show was “too beautiful to look at” to express their shock at the ugliness of the Vietnamese actors, actors whom in their own country are considered very good-looking (true, the commentators repulsion may have been triggered by current events). This buzz phrase is often used in negative reviews, especially of mainland movies and TV shows because they are just so over-the-top that you just can’t stand to watch them.

9. 也是醉了 (yě shì zuì le): I am drunk
This buzzword originates from Jin Yong's novel The Swordsman. The hero in the novel, Ling Huchong, satirizes others' flattering by saying, "The moment I see those who flatter me would I feel so uncomfortable as if I were drunk." A group of DotA players began using this phrase. Later on, it started being used in the game League of Legends (which the 90s kids are crazy about). Whether one's skill is good or bad, they will say "我也是醉了," meaning "Are you kidding me?” You can use it when you feel helpless, depressed, speechless… It can also express admiration and surprise for something or someone: Look at what he’s doing, I am drunk! It can show your contempt and disdain for slag as well. For instance, an editor might write: This writer is taking too long to finish the cover article, I’m drunk!

Played the whole afternoon. It is full of teammates like pigs here. I am drunk. I have nothing more to say. (A quick note about “teammates like pigs.” This, too, is an oft-used gamer buzzword 像猪一样的队友– xiàng zhū yì yǎng de duì yǒu – it means stupid and/or lazy teammates.)

Cactus can really block radiation? I can’t believe you would ask such a stupid question. I am drunk.

Have argued so long with people like you who have the IQ of pond scum. I am drunk.

10. 拉仇恨 (lā chóu hèn): Courting envy
拉 (lā) means “pull” and 仇恨 (chóu hèn) means “hatred.” The three Chinese characters together mean “courting envy.” This phrase is often used when someone boasts to his or her friends in order to make them jealous. When someone shows off to his or her friends – anything from a newly bought bargain to weight loss achieved in a short time – some of the friends will say, as an indirect form of flattery, that it is an act of courting envy. Another common usage is when someone posts pictures of food that s/he is eating in the middle of night; that most definitely is la chou hen.

She takes photos before she takes off, after she lands, her lunch, her sunbathing, even her feet. That is totally la chou hen.

Tom bought the latest iPhone 6 Plus, and he is posting it on his WeChat. That is soooo la chou hen.

11.  辣条征服世界 就是辣么任性 (là tiáo zhēng fú shì jiè jiù shì là me rèn xìng): Hot strip conquers the world, so arbitrary
La tiao means hot strip. It is a cheap spicy snack made from flour that was especially popular when those of the 90s generation were children. Recently, netizens were shocked to learn that it costs $12 a package in some foreign countries, inspiring the phrase: "Hot strip conquers the world." The underlying meaning is that in these more developed countries, they will pay the equivalent of 74RMB for a pack of la tiao that can be bought for a mere kuai here, and inferring that this is the only thing that China has to offer to the more industrialized countries. Now people use it to ironically state that they are moneyed. So, if a guy says to you, “I will buy you 100 packages of la tiao. Will you go out with me?” he is telling you that he has money. Unfortunately, this fad of the la tiao won’t seem to die (though you might if you eat them). Posts on Weibo inviting “a foreign teacher to eat la tiao” have inspired numerous followers to post photos of their foreign teachers trying la tiao. (A clever marketing ploy one might ask???). Maybe they are just trying to slowly poison their teachers, as CCTV news has exposed that la tiao are, in fact, carcinogenic.

12. 那么问题来了挖掘机技术哪家强 (nà me wèn tí lái le wā jué jī jì shù nǎ jiā qiáng): Here comes the question, which excavator’s technology is the strongest?
Twenty-four years ago, Lan Xiang Occupation Technical School began running their famous advertisement. It goes something like this: “Which excavator’s technology is the strongest? Find Lan Xiang in Shandong, China. There are one hundred excavators for students to practice. First learn, pay after. Your first month's salary is the tuition. Free of charge for a one-month trial!” This commercial has been shown, unchanged, all around China since the 90s – its simple message repeatedly bombing the brains’ of viewers, attempting to brainwash them into compliance. How is it that this uninventive ad has successfully invaded the blogosphere? What "charm" does Lan Xiang's excavator have? Every time a netizen finishes a comment rather abruptly, they can simply add, "Then here comes the question, which excavator’s technology is the strongest?" It can be used fairly randomly (as with most buzzwords, many people hide behind them when they don't have a firm grasp on the concepts). Sociolinguistically speaking though, the “excavator’s technology” might just be the 90s gen’s way of subconsciously being self-deprecating (Or do we give them too much credit?). Or, it might just be one big joke on this generation by the person or persons who decided to start this buzz phrase buzzing. Maybe they are using this to make a social criticism on the repetitive, mindless use of buzzwords that members of the 90s gen incessantly bat back and forth to each other across the social network, because they can’t manage to pull anything more original out of their own brains. The mind reels…  Strictly speaking, however, for the majority of the “excavator” users, it is merely meant to show that they are indeed in-the-know, down with the terminology, up on the latest trends, in fashion, trending with the trendy. Observe in the samplings below:

After watching the episode one of the second season of Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., I can already guess the second. The Absorbing Man is so strong a normal car can’t hurt him. Agent Coulson must use large machinery to deal with him. So here comes the question, which excavator’s technology is the strongest?

The teacher said to me that I’m not good at examining the topic, and I don’t know how to dig out the thoughts, and I should ask a classmate for help. I wanted to ask her which classmate is good at digging out the thoughts, but instead I asked, “Teacher, which excavator’s technology is the strongest?”

Learning that her ex-husband was back together with Faye Wong, the pain in Cecilia Cheung’s heart was unbearable. She slapped her own chest crying out, "Which excavator’s technology is the strongest?"

 

Want to talk like a Hangzhounese? Here are some words you can try to impress your Hangzhou friends:
色阔 (sè kuo) Goodbye
莫牢牢 (mo láo láo) Very much
千色色 (qian se se) Too girly
上毛子(sháng máo zi) Last time
色基 (sè ji) Eat
熬扫 (áo sáo) Hurry up
册空 (cè kóng) Finding troubles
困告 (kùn gáo) Sleep
结棍/色照 (jiē gún / sē záo) Strong
阿岁铜板 (a suí tóng bai) Red envelope for CNY
搞搞儿 (gāo gāo er) Play
背寺老到 (bèi si láo dāo) Long-winded
拷瓦派儿 (kāo wā pái er) AA
勒个子 (lè ge zi) Armpit
择撒 (zé sā) What?
落位 (luó wéi) Comfortable
拷位儿 (kào wéi er) Fall in love
跌色拜倒 (diē se bāi dào) Hastily
发靥 (fā yè) Cute
接个套 (jiè gē tāo) What’s up?
哈人到怪 (hā rén dào guai) Scary
窝封叽糟 (wó féng jī zao) Dirty
克冲懵懂 (kē cóng méng dong) Sleepy

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The Expat Show is Coming Back Very Soon!

For the 12th consecutive year, the Expat Show Shanghai is back for the delight of families. 
Expatriates or locals, the Expat Show Shanghai will meet all your daily needs.

Shanghai is a cosmopolitan city, the whole world is represented here. However, creating your network, meeting new people, or simply keeping up to date with new businesses (services and products) can sometimes be complicated by the vastness of this city.

That's why the three days Expat Show brings together in one place everything you need. Thus, foodies will find their happiness within the "Food & Beverage Area" created in partnership with Sherpa's ; various tastings organised will fulfil wine, beer, and cocktail lovers dreams; families will not be left behind with stands dedicated to tourism, education, health but also to investment and finance.

Activities for young and adult visitors will be organized inside a dedicated space, and a relaxation area awaits all visitors for moments of exchange over a drink or a coffee. 

The members of the associations (non-profit, charities, Chambers of Commerce...) will also be there to present their activities and why not, soon, count you among their members.

GET TOGETHER COCKTAIL

This year, a big new feature!

The Expat Show is pleased to invite you to its "Get Together Cocktail".

In the Shanghai Exhibition Center, you are expected on Saturday, September 21st, from 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. on the Relaxing Area.

Wine, spirits and cocktails tasting with appetizers provided by our sponsors, will be an opportunity to share a pleasant moment.

Participation is free of charge and our generous sponsors have prepared many gifts for you. Come and try your luck! Games, trips, gifts are to be won!

SEE YOU ON SEPTEMBER 20TH AT 10AM!

On this Harvest Moon: The Mid-Autumn Festival

This year the Mid-Autumn Festival, or Moon Festival, falls on September 13th. This is the 2nd most important festival in China, after the Chinese New Year/Spring Festival blow out extravaganza. The Mid-Autumn Festival is a harvest festival that coincides with the autumnal equinox and marks the end of the summer harvest season, and its date varies from year to year because the Chinese can’t seem to let go of the Lunar Calendar. Of course, they’ve seen silverware too, but Jerry Seinfeld already did that bit.

Like everything else here, the history of the Mid-Autumn Festival dates all the way back, 3,000 years, to the Shang Dynasty, when the powerful sorcerer Lo Pan broke the curse of immortality by marrying a girl with green eyes…no, wait, that was the plot to Big Trouble in Little China. Here’s the real one, according to legend (or, Wikipedia, if you want to be a jerk about it):

“Chang'e and her husband Houyi were immortals living in heaven. One day, the ten sons of the Jade Emperor transformed into ten suns and scorched the Earth. Having failed to order his sons to stop ruining the Earth, the Jade Emperor summoned Houyi for help. Houyi, using his legendary archery skills, shot down nine of the sons, but spared one son (who conveniently became the Sun). The Jade Emperor was obviously not pleased with Houyi's solution to save the Earth as it involved Houyi murdering nine of his sons. As punishment, the Jade Emperor banished Houyi and Chang'e to live as mere mortals on Earth.

Seeing how miserable Chang'e felt over her loss of immortality, Houyi decided to go on a long, perilous quest to find the pill of immortality so that the couple could become immortal again. At the end of his quest he met the Queen Mother of the West who agreed to give him the pill, but warned him that each person needs only half the pill to become immortal.

Houyi brought the pill home and stored it in a case. He warned Chang'e not to open the case and then left home for a while. Like every other woman in the history of the world, she didn’t listen. She opened up the case and found the pill just as Houyi was returning home. Nervous Houyi would catch her fiddling with the pill, she swallows the whole thing like a stooge and starts to float into the sky because of the overdose. Although Houyi could have used his wicked archery skills to shoot her and tether her down, he couldn’t bear to do it and Chang'e kept on floating until she landed on the moon.

Although Chang’e missed her husband dearly, she wasn’t alone. She did have company of a jade rabbit that manufactured elixirs, and that of the lumberjack Wu Gang. The lumberjack offended the gods in his attempt to achieve immortality and was therefore banished to the moon. Wu Gang was allowed to leave the moon if he could cut down a tree that grew there. The problem was that each time he chopped it down; it would instantly grow back, effectively condemning him to live on the moon for eternity. Gods are tricky that way.”

So to commemorate this story, as well as the end of the harvest season, people throughout China gather their families together to catch up while eating moon cakes (discussed in more detail later) and pomelo. They also light lanterns to adorn their homes, temples, and even the sky. This last kind of lantern, called a, “sky lantern,” is really quite cool. They’re basically an ornate box kite that’s lit with a candle, but when they’re launched, after night fall, they make for a beautiful, candlelit sky. Add to this luminescence that of the full round moon and you’ve got yourself the makings of one festive evening. It’s also the perfect occasion to pull out your old Neil Young albums (namely Harvest and Harvest Moon) and rock out.

Alternate Uses for Moon Cakes:

Let’s face it; the moon cake is the fruitcake of China. No one actually wants them (other than for re-gifting purposes). They’re just the gift you give people to let them know how little you care for them. For the person on the receiving end, it’s really a slap in the face. The giver of said crap cakes gets to slide by on the kindness of the gesture, while you’ve got to work up a smile, and pretend to appreciate what is in essence, an empty, backhanded act of passive aggression. Giving someone moon cakes is the same as saying, “I’ve nothing but contempt for you, but I do plan on knocking you up for a favor in the next couple weeks, so try not to choke.” But all’s not lost because moon cakes can serve many other functions besides pissing all over the definition of cake. So as those decorative boxes of banality from all your condescending know-nothing colleagues at work pile up in your home, don’t think about how drunk you’re going to have to get to choke them all down. Get creative. Think like Martha Stewart, or just keep reading and use some of the ideas we’ve come up with. It’s a good thing.

Stabilize that wobbly chair or coffee table

One of the nice things about a cake that’s got the density of a brake pad is that it can endure a sizeable amount of force without breaking apart. That makes it one of the best materials to use to support that bothersome short leg on your table, chair, or bar stool. It also won’t scuff up your hardwood floors.

Serves as a fantastic replacement puck for ice or street hockey

Thanks to the moon cakes stout, cylindrical design, (It’s called, yeast, you a-holes! It’s what makes baked goods fluffy and delicious. Stop living in the past.), it has, not only the same shape as a standard ice hockey puck, but also, almost, the exact same dimensions. So here’s what you do. Take a box of these abominations and throw them in the freezer for a couple hours while you gather the gang for a good old fashion game of street hockey, or take them down to the skating rink at the MixC Mall and have at it.

Give to the needy

This is just to prove our point that these shit snacks are universally reviled. Go up to a homeless person asking for money and give them a box of these bastards instead, and see if you don’t get pegged in the back of the head with one as gratitude for your selfless gesture.

Protect yourself from stray dogs

It’s late and you’re stumbling out of the bar after a few too many with your buddies. Your senses are impaired, as is your sense of direction. You find yourself alone, walking down a dark street when you spot a mongrel dog that has shown an interest in you. You’re too drunk to outrun it, and it’s the only thing between you and your warm bed. What do you do? You pull out the moon cakes that some jackanapes forced on you and you force them right into the dog’s mouth. Like peanut butter on their nose, this should keep it occupied for at least 10 minutes, giving you plenty of time to make a staggering escape.

Whip at motorists who don't obey the traffic laws

How many times have you been on your bike, or in a taxi, and you’ve almost been killed by some motorist who thinks the rules don’t apply to them? If you’ve been here a week it’s happened at least once. Don’t lie to us. Of course, you want to throw something at them, but all you have handy is your cell phone and/or wallet and, obviously, you can’t throw those. Moon cakes combine the heft of a billiard ball with the softness of a dessert you’d still pass on in a hostage situation. You make your point, no damage to the target’s car, but the message was received. Everyone wins.

Earmuffs in the winter

Get creative this winter and be the first one on your block to chase away the chills with some homemade, moon cake earmuffs. All you need is a needle, some decorative, elastic yarn, 2 moon cakes (one for each ear) and a microwave. Cut 5 lengths of yarn at a measure of one and half times the circumference of your head. Work the yarn through the moon cakes laterally (through the sides). Adjust the position of the cakes so that each one rests comfortably over each ear, with your lengths of yarn going around your head like a sweat band. When you’ve got them positioned how you like them, tie the ends of your yarn together to ensure a snug fit around your cabeza. When you’re ready to hit the town, throw your stylish new earmuffs in the microwave for 30 seconds and prepare to laugh derisively at Old Man Winter.

Haze the new guy

Like snake wine and unicycles, moon cakes serve no purpose. They do, however, work well for gags, especially when the new guy in your office starts getting a little too big for his britches. Knock him down a peg, and remind him of his place by challenging his manhood with a moon cake eating contest. Basically, you just tell him that it’s a rite of passage we’ve all gone through and if he can’t eat 10 moon cakes in 10 minutes, no one will respect him. Whether or not he finishes them is beside the point. The point is, no one else is going to eat these things and they’re starting to take up space.

And there you have it. Seven great ways to get rid of your moon cakes, when re-gifting is simply not an option, but by no means, are these the only ways. Get creative and think up some yourself. You like building models? Build yourself a 1/10 scale trebuchet and see how far you can wing them. Or give them to kids. They’ll put anything in their mouths. Happy Mid-Autumn Festival, everybody!

2019 Qiantang River Tidal Bore and Surfing Competition

Qiantang River tidal bore is one the largest tidal bores in the world which reaches the most spectacular on the eighteenth day of the eight month on Chinese lunar calendar. To watch the 9-meter tidal waves, you can choose the best locations in Haining city, about 50 kilometers from Hangzhou.

2019 Qiantang River International Surfing Competition will be held from Sept.11th to 16th, during which the Qiantang River tides are surging frighteningly high in the year.

Opening ceremony (about 40 minutes)

Time: 3:30pm - 4:10pm, September 12th
Location: Qiantang Farm 钱唐农园 (江干区5号港路)

Qiantang River International Surfing Competition (4 days)

Time: September 13th - 16th (13th-15th: preliminaries, 16th: finals and closing ceremony).
Venue: Qianjiang No.9 Bridge to No.1 Bridge (Qiantang River Bridge) 钱江九桥至钱江一桥(钱塘江大桥)

Closing Ceremony Location: Qiantang Farm 钱唐农园 (江干区5号港路)

Teams: 9 teams (China, Australia, Spain, South Africa, Brazil, California, France, Indonesia and Puerto Rico)
Prize: 200,000RMB

Surfing Carnival (5 days)

Time: 10:30am - 4:30pm, September 12th - 16th
Location: Qiantang Farm 钱唐农园 (江干区5号港路)

What to expect: There will be four surf theme carnival activities: water rafting, surfing pool, surfing culture exhibition, surfing board teaching, as well as magical spider wall, frisbee, bowling and many other activities.

Qiantang Music Festival (1 day)

Time: 6:30pm - 8:30pm, Saturday, September 14th
Location: Garden Lawn at Qiantang Farm 钱唐农园大草坪 (江干区5号港路)

The referee of Qiantang River International Surfing Competition, Peter Towndend is the first World Surfing Champion and the former coach of China National Surfing Team.

Nine teams from home and abroad will surf on the so-called “Silver Tides” from Sept. 13th to 16th. World top surfers, Dean Morrison, Eneko Acero, Kyle McGeary and Made Garut Widiarta will participate in the event.

Dean Morrison, who is the champion of Australia and European Division of World Men's Shortboard Surfing Championship Tour. He is one of the most celebrated Australian surfers of the modern era, finishing a career best ninth in 2007. In the water Dean is a pocket dynamo, known for his compact, fluid style and sublime cutback. On land his humility and good nature ensure he is the kind of pro surfer who is approachable for people from all walks of life.

Eneko Acero, one of the most important and influential surfers of Spain and Europe. At that time it was just him on a worldwide tour with surfers from all over the place but his hometown/country. Still today, Eneko is surfing in a daily basis, manages a team of an international brand and of course proudly holds the surname Acero, a surfing family you might heard of from him, his older brother Iker Acero or the charismatic Kepa Acero.

Kyle McGeary, Team (NSSA) champion surfer, he is an underground local surfer from Huntington Beach, California. "Never heard of Kyle? Then you probably don't surf the pier, because if you did, you'd see him hucking big rotators everyday."

Made Garut Widiarta, born and raised in Kuta he started surfing at the age of 9 at his home break Half Ways, Garut is one of the most recognizable Indonesian surfers in the world and he has received more high profile attention in the media than any Indonesian surfer since Rizal Tanjung. Is name is I Made Widiarta a.k.a Garut.

The top local surfers will also participate on behalf of Chinese National Surfing Team. Surfing in the Qiantang River has only been allowed since 2008. During the competition, surfers will follow the tidal bore in motorboats and jet skis, and then take turns riding the waves.

Surfing will be included in the 2020 Summer Olympic Games in Tokyo. The inclusion has given a boost to the sport in China, where it remains relatively new.

Hangzhou government hopes the competition can further promote the sport among citizens, especially the youth.

The competition will be broadcast nationwide by China Central Television.

HIS Welcome Back BBQ Party, A Great Event For The HIS Community!

On Saturday, September 7th, 2019, Hangzhou International School held their Annual Welcome Back Barbecue and once again gathered the HIS community, parents, students and teachers, they had an opportunity to welcome the new families and to catch up with the old friends while enjoying themselves, the tasty food, and the activities provided.

MORE’s editor Loren was fortunately enough to be invited, while it was initially a little foreign to him—not having kids going to the school, not being a Binjiang-er—his years of being in Hangzhou felt like they finally paid off, and he bumped into a good cross-section of international folk he has known for a while now.

The food was predictably excellent, with burgers from returning favorite Slim’s one of the queues we had to try, but also present was the Indian faire from Pita’s and Tika’s and pizza from Angelo’s.

The kids had a great time too, with musical and dance performances, face painting and candy.

We had a great time talking to some new and returning teachers, eager to get the new school year fully underway, and had a great time talking about the crafts of teaching and parenting, as well as the sense of community that HIS brings to its families and faculty who come together from more than 50 nations to make events like this fun and engaging. We are looking forward to continue having a great school year!

Hello, Hangzhou! Epermarket is Now Delivering 7x a Week!

Looking for fresh and imported products from a source you can trust? Why not take advantage of Epermarket’s new and improved delivery service (now upgraded from 3 days to 7 days a week)? When ordering online, you can pick all the high-quality items you love and have them delivered to your door at on a day that suits you!

If you’re not available at a specific time of the day when your order arrives, you can always select, “Leave my Order at the Door” option, so you can feel safe in the knowledge that your fresh and frozen items will be carefully stored for you in cooler and carton boxes upon your arrival.

Ordering online at Epermarket couldn’t be easier—they have a wide range of hard-to-find products to choose from. Did we mention they have over 5000 imported products as well? And all their fresh groceries are packed on the day they are delivered, so you can be assured of the best quality hand-picked items.

What else is new at Epermarket?

Their Wine Fair promotion! This exclusive wine sale is coming up and will include classic beverages from some of the finest wine regions in the world. From Chablis to Prosecco and Rosé, you can find over 100 wines to dive into and enjoy in the comfort of your home. These wines will be on sale from up to 40% off, starting from September 10th, so keep your eyes peeled for more at www.epermarket.com.

New to Epermarket? Simply scan the QR code to register and get 50RMB off your first order! 

Offer is valid until Friday, the 13th September.

Find out more about other promotions when you visit their website Epermarket.com!

The idea behind Epermarket has always been simple: a place for internationals to buy the food they love, from a source they can trust. They place quality and safety first, with all products curated by professionals, all passionate about food and living a healthy life. Whether you are looking for fresh fruit and organic vegetables, pantry favorites or even home care products, Epermarket has everything you need.

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